Brian Grosberg, MD: Device Development in Migraine

November 17, 2018

The director of the Hartford Headache Center spoke about the trend toward device use in migraine treatment, and some of the reasons that may have prompted it.

“A device like this offers an opportunity for patients to not have to think about [sacrificing medication use], where they can end up using it, and they don’t have to feel like they’re necessarily sacrificing efficacy.”

At the American Headache Society’s 2018 Scottsdale Headache Symposium, a number of neuromodulatory and neurostimulating devices were on display a number of product theaters. In fact, Theranica even announced positive results for its Nerivio Migra non-invasive neuromodulation device for acute migraine treatment.

Although a number of acute therapies exist for patients with migraine and several others are in development, there remains a large number of patients who are resistant to treatments such as triptans. This has led in part, to an increase in the number of devices intended to provide relief to these patients—the Nerivio Migra among them.

Brian Grosberg, MD, the director of the Hartford Headache Center in Connecticut, was the principal investigator in the TCH-003 trial of the Theranica device. As such, he sat down with NeurologyLive at the Symposium to discuss the trend toward device use in migraine treatment, and some of the reasons that may have prompted it.