Bruce Cree, MD, PhD, MAS: Inebilizumab in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

September 5, 2019
Bruce Cree, MD, PhD, MAS

The clinical research director of the University of California, San Fransciso’s Multiple Sclerosis Center discussed the findings of a 230-patient study of inebilizumab versus placebo in NMOSD.

“This was a large undertaking. It involved 99 centers in 24 countries, and the goal of the study was to determine whether this monoclonal antibody that depletes B cells was clinically effective at preventing relapses in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder…these results were very positive.”

At the 2019 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting, May 4-10, in Philadelphia, 3 separate presentations focused on the positive results of an investigational therapy for a condition lacking even a single medicine: neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Additionally, all 3 therapies being tested operate through a different mechanism of action, offering a drastic level of hope for the clinicians treating NMO.

One of those studies, N-MOmentum, was led by Bruce Cree, MD, PhD, MAS, clinical research director, UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center, and explored the effects of inebilizumab in a 3:1 randomization compared with placebo for 6.5 months.

The humanized monoclonal antibody binds to and depletes CD19+ B cells, and in this phase 3 study of 230 patients with NMOSD, a number of significant decreases in key end points were reported due to treatment. In a conversation with NeurologyLive, Cree shared insight from the findings, including that inebilizumab reduced the incidence of disease relapse by 78%.

For more coverage of AAN 2019, click here.

REFERENCES

Cree B, Bennett J, Kim HJ, et al. A Double-masked, Placebo-controlled Study with Open-label Period to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Inebilizumab in Adult Subjects with Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders— Top line efficacy and safety results. Presented at: American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting; May 4-9, 2019; Philadelphia, PA. Plenary 02.001.

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