International Journal of MS Care: Highlights From the March/April 2023 Issue

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Review the latest peer-reviewed articles dedicated to the multidisciplinary management of multiple sclerosis published in the International Journal of MS Care.

The International Journal of MS Care is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary, open access journal and the official journal of the Consortium of MS Centers. The journal strives to be useful and pertinent to all who are part of an MS care team, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and more.

As part of NeurologyLive's ongoing partnership with the CMSC, we're happy to spotlight some of the latest peer-reviewed articles published in IJMSC.

What does current research tell us about relationships between people with MS and incontinence, music therapy, and community mobility? What do clinicians need to know about working with people with MS who are transgender or affected by climate change or navigating gender in a disease that affects women more often than men?

Read summaries of the articles in our most recently published issue below and head to IJMSC.org for more.

1. Effect of Backward and Forward Walking on Lower Limb Strength, Balance, and Gait in Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

DelMastro, Ruiz, Simaitis, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2022-010

Approximately 85% of people with MS have gait impairment. The most common interventions are exercise training, physical therapy, and gait training, all involving some kind of forward walking exercise; however, backward walking has been shown to produce greater improvements in therapeutic variables (eg, step length, velocity, cadence) in persons with neurological impairments such as Parkinson disease and cerebral palsy. Might it do the same for persons with MS? The study data reveals improvement in an unexpected area.

2. Examining the Influence of Cognition on the Relationship Between Backward Walking and Falls in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis

Edwards, Daugherty, and Fritz

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2021-130

Approximately 85% of people with MS have gait impairment. The most common interventions are exercise training, physical therapy, and gait training, all involving some kind of forward walking exercise; however, backward walking has been shown to produce greater improvements in therapeutic variables (eg, step length, velocity, cadence) in persons with neurological impairments such as Parkinson disease and cerebral palsy. Might it do the same for persons with MS? The study data reveals improvement in an unexpected area.

3. Outcomes and Health Care Service Use in Adults 50 Years or Older With and Without Multiple Sclerosis: A 6-Year Observational Analysis

Freeman, Lucas, Zhou, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2021-124

According to recent studies in the United States, those aged 55 to 64 years now make up the largest portion of people with MS. Since this is an evolving trend, data and research on this population is minimal. How does MS interact with aging? This observational analysis looked at health care claims data on infections and malignancies, use of skilled nursing facilities and MRI, and mobility impairment among those 50 and older with and without a diagnosis of MS.

4. The Psychosocial Impact of Parental Multiple Sclerosis on Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Haker, Peper, Haagen, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2021-075

As the average person diagnosed with MS is a woman between the ages of 20 and 40, literature on the impact of a parental diagnosis on children should be abundant; however, this literature review uncovered the need for more research to understand how having a parent with MS affects a child's psychosocial development. The included studies reviewed psychosocial adjustment, psychiatric disorders, coping skills, feelings toward parents, early childhood development, body image, mother-daughter interaction, and education. Despite a trend toward a negative effect, more research is needed to clearly understand the connections. One recommendation is that parents and clinicians should understand that there is an effect and be conscious and deliberate about communicating and addressing it.

5. Pneumococcal Vaccination Practices in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibodies After Pharmacy and Nursing Collaboration

Reindel, Rightmier, Dean, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2021-127

We love a good multidisciplinary team study at IJMSC. Reindel et al investigated whether nurse and clinical pharmacist collaboration improved the pneumococcal vaccination adherence of patients taking immunosuppressive anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. There was not a standard procedure to ensure adherence in place at this clinic prior to the implementation of this study. Would workflow improvements allow more patients to be vaccinated within the CDC's optimum time frame?

6. Investigating Relationships Among Interoceptive Awareness, Emotional Susceptibility, and Fatigue in People With Multiple Sclerosis

Ware, O'Connor, Bub, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2021-007

Fatigue is a persistent and debilitating symptom of MS. This mixed-methods study combined qualitative and quantitative measures to deeply explore the experience of fatigue for those with MS. The qualitative results revealed 4 themes: body sensations experienced with fatigue, emotions experienced with fatigue, mind-body connection, and impact of fatigue on physical activity. The multifaceted results offer practical considerations for clinicians helping patients to remain active and to combat the physical and emotional manifestations of fatigue, ultimately improving quality of life.

7. Addressing Health-Related Quality of Life Among Children with Multiple Sclerosis

McArthur, Peterson, Sosnoff, et al

doi:10.7224/1537-2073.2022-044

The COVID-19 pandemic created many opportunities to pivot to achieve research goals. This study moved from IP to O, in-person to online. Individualized Reduction of Falls–Online (iROLL-O) is a 6-week, group-based online intervention designed for full-time wheelchair or scooter users with MS. The aim of this evidenced-based program was to reduce fall frequency and fear of falling and provide fall management and prevention techniques. Qualitative and quantitative results offered valuable insight for future research. *Readers can earn CE credit with this article.

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