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Overview of the Prevalence and Variety of Pediatric Sleep Disorders: Carol Rosen, MD

Disease Spotlight | <b>Disease Spotlight: Insomnia</b>

The professor of pediatrics at Case Western University provided insight on the typical sleep issues seen in children and adolescents, and how they impact overall quality of life. [WATCH TIME: 5 minutes]

WATCH TIME: 5 minutes

"The sixth bucket, which are the rarest disorders, are what we call hypersomnias, or ‘too sleepy’ disorders. You get enough sleep, but you still can’t stay awake during the day, and it’s hard wake up in the morning. The most common disorder in that bucket is narcolepsy."

In recent years, sleep has become more prominently recognized as a pillar of health, next to major lifestyle decisions that involve diet and exercise, among others. For children and adolescents, sleep disorders are common, and are associated with several negative effects to quality of life. This age group may experience academic, behavioral, developmental, and social difficulties, weight abnormalities, and other health problems as a result from their poor sleep.

To fully diagnose a sleep disorder, children will typically undergo a thorough historical and physical exam, that will also include questions about home, school, and their sleep environment. Additionally, they may discuss recent changes in routine or social stressors, school performance, previous sleep history, and other medical conditions. Pediatric sleep disorders are not all that different from those seen in adults; however, some of the prevalence rates may slightly differ.

In an interview with NeurologyLive®, Carol Rosen, MD, professor of pediatrics at Case Western University, discussed the various sleep disorders seen in children and adolescents. Rosen, who also serves on the board of directors for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, provided commentary on how these conditions are approached and whether they are treated differently in adults.