Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2019

The Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held July 14-18, 2019 in Los Angeles, California, is where international investigators, clinicians and care providers gather to share the latest study results, theories, and discoveries that will help bring the world closer to breakthroughs in dementia science.
The assistant professor and cognitive neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania Frontotemporal Degeneration Center will share additional insights on Alzheimer disease at the upcoming International Congress on the Future of Neurology, taking place September 27-28, 2019 in New York City.
The co-director of the University of Pennsylvania Memory Center will share additional insights on Alzheimer disease at the upcoming International Congress on the Future of Neurology, taking place September 27-28, 2019 in New York City.
The associate professor of neuroepidemiology and digital health spoke about the importance of findings from an observational study which showed that adherence to a healthy lifestyle can offset the genetic risk for dementia.
This data demonstrates that patients with Alzheimer disease are at an increased risk for seizures, in particular in more advanced disease stages, which emphasizes a need for seizure history assessment to inform individual therapeutic decisions and the necessity of systematic treatment studies.
The professor of age-related diseases and Dean of the University of Exeter Medical School spoke about the need for proper training of nursing home staff in order to improve quality of life in patients with dementia.
The professor of neurology and founding chair of the John T. Macdonald Foundation Department of Human Genetics at the University of Miami spoke about how the risk of Alzheimer disease differs between ethnic groups, despite being associated with the same genetic marker.
The professor of emergency medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health spoke about how telemedicine in senior living communities can effectively decrease ED use by individuals with dementia. 
The research fellow at the University of Exeter spoke about the findings from her observational study which showed that living a favorable lifestyle could offset the risk for dementia, even if that risk is genetically linked.