European Committee for Treatment and Research in Mulitple Sclerosis 2018

The 34th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Mulitple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) was held in Berlin, Germany, from October 10 to 12, 2018. The congress covered all the latest and exciting new developments in multiple sclerosis, including treatment, genetics, pathology, imaging, immunology, and epidemiology.
The medical director of the UCSF Multiple Sclerosis Center discussed the idea behind remyelination and shared his thoughts on what the best shot at developing a therapy might be.
The neurologist from Cleveland Clinic discussed the challenges of treating progressive MS, and shared his clinical experience with ibudilast.
For the director of the Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center, a biomarker is perhaps only as useful as the clinician community’s ability to read out its measurements.
The director of the Comprehensive Multiple Sclerosis Center at Thomas Jefferson University discussed the concept of lymphocyte depletion to reset the immune system.
The smartphone application-led program, Floodlight Open, recently initiated in the US and Canada.
The goal of the free application is to make cognitive assessments routine in multiple sclerosis treatment.
One of the highly debated topics at ECTRIMS 2018 was the use of the investigational biomarker, neurofilament light, in the clinic.
The professor of neurology at Colorado University spoke about the ongoing phase IV trial to determine the safety of DMT discontinuation in MS.
The Head of Global Clinical Development in Neurology at EMD Serono provided insight into the therapy's performance in phase IIb.
The director of Thomas Jefferson's Comprehensive Multiple Sclerosis Center spoke about the introduction of this treatment method into MS.
The staff neurologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Mellen Center for Multiple Sclerosis spoke about the current understanding of the biomarker.
The Global Head of Neuroimmunology at Genentech discussed the upcoming phase III trial of ocrelizumab while on-site at ECTRIMS 2018.
The vice president of Medical Research at Biogen spoke about the intersection between high-quality data utilization and individualized medicine in multiple sclerosis.
The professor of neurology at the University of Colorado posited that if certain criteria are met, it could be appropriate to take patients with multiple sclerosis off of DMT.