Geert Mayer, MD: Safety, Efficacy of Solriamfetol for Excessive Sleepiness In Narcolepsy, OSA

September 29, 2018

Long-term maintenance of efficacy was demonstrated with solriamfetol for treatment of excessive sleepiness with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea.

“I think it [solriamfetol] does a great reduction and the number of patients who are responders is extremely high."

Over the years, sleep medicine has undergone a great deal of advancement in therapeutics, but one disorder particularly lacking good, safe and effective treatments is excessive sleepiness with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea. Solriamfetol, a dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with wake-promoting effects, is one such entity under investigation. In March, the FDA accepted an application for solriamfetol as a treatment for excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea and has a PDUFA action date set for Dec. 20, 2018.

At the 24th Congress of European Sleep Research Society in Basel, Switzerland, Geert Mayer, MD, neurologist and sleep specialist, Philipps University of Marburg, sat down with NeurologyLive to discuss the results of a long-term study observing the safety and maintenance of efficacy of solriamfetol (JZP-110) for treatment of excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea.

Mayer noted that the study proved solriamfetol, an additional wake-promoting agent, to be an efficacious medication that has good safety and long-term data and does not impact nighttime sleep. Long-term maintenance of efficacy was demonstrated after 1 year of treatment and the safety profile was consistent with prior placebo-controlled studies.

Future studies, Mayer concluded, need to be conducted to best determine long-term data and determine if the safety profile stays the same in say 5 or 10 years. Additionally, Mayer suggested that solriamfetol could possibly be used in other fields of excessive daytime sleepiness or even perhaps other neurodegenerative disorders.