Research from IJMSC June 2024

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Here's the latest multidisciplinary multiple sclerosis (MS) research from the International Journal of MS Care.

Here's the latest multidisciplinary multiple sclerosis (MS) research from the International Journal of MS Care.

Our current article offering continuing education credit is from Dykes et al and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive MS Center. The study reveals that Black people with MS have earlier disease onset, more severe initial presentations, and greater disability compared to White patients, even after adjusting for socioeconomic factors. In particular, Black women with relapsing MS show significantly worse outcomes. The findings highlight the urgent need for comprehensive, prospective research to understand and address these disparities in MS outcomes.

People with MS often suffer from impairments in mobility and cognition, leading to frequent and costly falls. The study by Monaghan et al evaluated the reliability and sensitivity of backward walking (BW) metrics, particularly the backward-walking Timed 25-Foot Walk (BW-T25-FW), as potential predictors of fall risk in people with MS. The findings suggest that BW velocity and the B-T25-FW are reliable measures that could be incorporated into clinical assessments to improve fall risk detection and overall functional mobility evaluation in people with MS.

Abou-Rass et al find that the COVID-19 quarantine significantly increased physical, mental, and emotional fatigue in people with MS, and these fatigue levels did not return to prepandemic levels even after restrictions were lifted. People with progressive MS experienced higher physical fatigue compared to those with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Clinicians should assess all types of fatigue in people with MS to ensure comprehensive care.

Christine Hampton presents a case study where she used serial casting as an intervention for a 52-year-old woman with RRMS, resulting in reduced spasticity, pain, and improved range of motion, strength, and functional use of her right arm. The findings suggest that serial casting, combined with targeted therapeutic interventions, can be beneficial for managing upper extremity spasticity in MS, though further research is needed.

Come back next month for more research from the IJMSC community or check out our website for the latest at any time.

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