Connecting Snoring and Sleep Apnea: William Noah, MD

April 5, 2021
William Noah, MD

Senior medical director, Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee and OSAinHome; chairperson, MTSU Sleep Research Consortium

The director and founder of the Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee discussed his team’s efforts to further patient understanding of obstructive sleep apnea.

“That's what determines the problem. Does the event trigger a fight or flight reaction in the body does it trigger norepinephrine release? So that's where we have created the term sleep norepinephrine release—S-Nore-R. We're trying to equate snoring and sleep apnea, and it's been really successful.”

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that received positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy machines as part of care from an integrated sleep practice (ISP) had better long-term adherence to the therapy than those who received machines from traditional durable medical equipment suppliers (DMEs), according to a recent study conducted by Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee.

NeurologyLive reached out to William Noah, MD, senior author of the study and the director and founder of the Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee, to learn more about OSA and challenges in diagnosing OSA. (Editor’s note: Noah was kind enough to speak with us while snowed in and working at his farm, so he asks that you please excuse his appearance on video.)

Noah discussed his team’s efforts to update the term OSA to one that better encompasses the condition. He also discussed how to support patient understanding of the condition.

REFERENCE
Andry JM, Tobin G, Shafin C, Noah W. Positive airway pressure therapy supplied by an integrated sleep practice associated with greater adherence among pre–Medicare-aged patients with sleep-disordered breathing. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021. 17(1):31-36. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.8786