Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and MRI Lesions: 5 Important Facts

February 13, 2018

In this 6-minute video presentation, Dr. Andrew Wilner describes the epidemiology and pathophysiology of carbon monoxide poisoning and reviews the implications of a recently published observational study.

In addition to acute toxicity, carbon monoxide poisoning can result in delayed neurological sequelae. In this 6-minute video presentation, Dr. Andrew Wilner describes the epidemiology and pathophysiology of carbon monoxide poisoning and reviews a recent observational study of 387 patients with carbon monoxide poisoning who were evaluated with MRI diffusion weighted imaging (DWI).1

Results include the localization of DWI lesions and the spectrum of delayed neurological symptoms and signs. The study concluded that the presence of DWI lesions after carbon monoxide poisoning is a strong predictor for the development of delayed neurological sequelae.

Dr Wilner is Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and a staff physician at Regional One Health in Memphis, TN. Dr. Wilner's latest book, Bullets and Brains, is a collection of over 100 essays that focus on the intersection of neurology and society. Twitter: @drwilner.

References:

1. Jeon SB, Sohn CH, Seo DW, et al. Acute Brain Lesions on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Delayed Neurological Sequelae in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. JAMA Neurol. 2018 Jan 29. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.4618. [Epub ahead of print]