The Obstacle of Discrimination in Alzheimer Care: Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH

March 11, 2021
Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH

Chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer, Alzheimer’s Association

The chief diversity, equity and inclusion officer at the Alzheimer’s Association discussed the findings of the association’s special edition of its annual Facts and Figures report.

“We wanted a deeper understanding of some of the barriers that underrepresented and diverse populations face when accessing and seeking dementia care, and 2 new surveys found that discrimination is a significant barrier to dementia care among Asian, Black, Hispanic, and Native American [communities].”

The Alzheimer’s Association recently released its annual Facts and Figures report, which details a number of key data points for the dementia community regarding the prevalence, treatment, and care of patients with Alzheimer disease and dementia.1 This year’s paper included a special report that highlights some significant information about the care of individuals and the impact of racial and ethnic attitudes.2

Notably, the survey found that 36% of Black Americans, 18% of Hispanic Americans, and 19% of Asian Americans felt that discrimination put a barrier on their access to receive care for Alzheimer disease. In total, 42% of Native Americans, 34% of Asian Americans, and 33% of Hispanic Americans reported having experienced discrimination when navigating health care settings for their care recipient. For Black Americans, that rate was 50%.

In addition, half or more of non-White caregivers say they have experienced discrimination in a health care setting. Carl V. Hill, PhD, MPH, chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer, Alzheimer’s Association, spoke to NeurologyLive to offer some insight into the report’s findings and what the Association is learning about the current state of racial and ethnic attitudes among this population. Hill, who oversees strategic initiatives to strengthen outreach and providing communities with resources and support to address Alzheimer, also shared ways that physicians can get involved.

To read the report, click here. To get in touch with the Alzheimer’s Association about health equity opportunities, call 800-272-3900.

REFERENCES
1. New Alzheimer’s Association Report Examines Racial and Ethnic Attitudes on Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care. News release. March 2, 2021. Accessed March 11, 2021. https://www.alz.org/news/2021/new-alzheimers-association-report-examines-racial
2. Alzheimer’s Association. 2021 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures Special Report: Race, Ethnicity and Alzheimer's in America. March 2, 2021. Accessed March 11, 2021. https://www.alz.org/media/Documents/alzheimers-facts-and-figures.pdf