Understanding the Underlying Progression of Multiple Sclerosis

Opinion
Video

This program is supported by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Content is independently developed by CMSC.

Mark Freedman, MD, MSc, Tanuja Chitnis, MD, and Ahmed Obeidat, MD, PhD, discuss the limitations of neurofilament light chain in identifying disease progression.

In this segment, experts discuss the challenge of explaining NFL results to patients and their families. The discussion then shifts to the topic of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the potential of NFL as a biomarker for disease progression.

Tanuja Chitnis, MD, notes that NFL is not a strong biomarker for non-active progression independent of relapses. However, it is elevated in people with secondary progressive MS, particularly in cases with disease activity such as new relapses or new gadolinium-enhancing lesions. She highlights the usefulness of NFL in understanding the active forms of secondary progressive MS and its association with cognitive decline and disability worsening.

Mark Freedman, MD, MSc, asks about the possibility of other biomarkers that might complement or surpass NFL for assessing the progressive phase of MS. Tanuja Chitnis, MD, mentions GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), which is considered a marker of axonal damage and activated astrocytes. GFAP appears to be increasing in secondary progressive MS, especially in patients without inflammatory disease activity. It is emerging as a potential marker of progression independent of relapses.

Video synopsis is AI-generated and reviewed by HCPLive® editorial staff.

This program is supported by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Content is independently developed by CMSC.
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