American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting 2019

The American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting, held December 6-10, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland, is the largest gathering on epilepsy in the world, briniging together epilepsy professionals in academia, clinical practice, industry, and advocacy.
The assistant professor of neurology at the University of Wisconsin detailed the importance of transition clinics for pediatric patients with epilepsy.
The associate professor of neurology and director of the Women With Epilepsy Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine discussed the rates of breastfeeding among women with epilepsy.
The professor of neurology at NYU Langone Medical Center discussed the importance of these safety data for intranasal diazepam, and why future comparative data would be essential.
The professor of neurology and epilepsy specialist at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine discussed the research on seizure freedom scores and their influence on individualized clinical care.
The assistant professor of neurology at the University of Wisconsin provided insight on the additional oversight required when caring for adult epilepsy patients who remain on the ketogenic diet.  
The professor of neurology and executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, San Francisco detailed the connection between the gut microbiome and epilepsy. 
The assistant professor of neurology at the University of Wisconsin discussed the challenges of transitioning patients on the ketogenic diet from pediatric to adult epilepsy care.
Despite showing great promise to provide additional and supplementary care to patients with a number of conditions, including epilepsy, some barriers remain to bringing telemedicine to more providers and patients.
The director of the Pediatric Epilepsy Program at Weill Cornell Medicine detailed ways to utilize quality measures to improve implementation of in patients with infantile spasms.
The director of the Pediatric Epilepsy Program at Weill Cornell Medicine detailed the reasons behind why patients with infantile spasms do not receive recommended care.
The staff epileptologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Epilepsy Center spoke to the benefits of telemedicine for patients with epilepsy, and how the practice can alleviate a number of burdens.
The professor of neurology at NYU Langone offered insight into the state of affairs with current seizure rescue medications and added her insight into how intranasal diazepam may improve the patient experience.
The director of Infantile Spasms Program at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital discussed why learning more about patients with infantile spasms may lead to further breakthroughs on the origins of autism spectrum disorder.
The professor of neurology at NYU Langone spoke to her clinical experience with cenobamate and how she anticipates it might be utilized once it becomes commercially available.
The staff epileptologist at Cleveland Clinic’s Epilepsy Center spoke to her experience using telemedicine to manage patients with epilepsy and some of the unexpected perspectives it offers.
The director of Infantile Spasms Program at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital detailed his personal experience counseling parents whose first child has infantile spasms.
The professor of neurology at NYU Langone discussed cenobamate’s potential as a treatment option for patients who have uncontrolled seizures, as well as its ability to bring a high number of patients toward complete seizure freedom.
The professor and chief of pediatric neurology, and director of the comprehensive epilepsy program and neuroscience institute at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, detailed his experience with patients treated with perampanel.
The director of epilepsy surgery and associate professor of neurosurgery at UC Irvine spoke to the advances that have been made in epilepsy surgery and in noninvasive or minimally invasive techniques, as well as the impact they’ve had on outcomes.
The medical director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Clinic at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital discusses his early stage gene therapy trial for Dravet syndrome.
The assistant professor of psychology at East Carolina discussed how to improve adherence in young adults and children with epilepsy, and how physicians can go about checking quality of life in patients.
The assistant professor of psychology at East Carolina University spoke to the challenges of overcoming adherence issues in patients with epilepsy, for whom it is so vital.
The professor of neurology and pediatrics and director of the Pediatric Epilepsy Center at the University of California, San Francisco, discussed his personal experience with fenfluramine and the advantages that the drug may present when treating patients with Dravet syndrome.
The director of pediatric epilepsy and the Herscot Center for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex at Massachusetts General Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School spoke to the safety outcomes from GWPCARE6 and CBD’s low-dose efficacy.
The medical director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Clinic at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital discussed the advantages of intranasal diazepam over traditional midazolam and rectal diazepam.
The assistant professor of psychology at East Carolina University offered insight about the resources are available to physicians and providers and what techniques can be useful to help patients have a better quality of life in light of refractory and uncontrolled seizures.
The director of epilepsy surgery and associate professor of neurosurgery at UC Irvine spoke about the consequences of patients choosing to forgo beneficial surgery and the importance of communication between surgeon and epileptologist.
The director of epilepsy surgery and associate professor of neurosurgery at UC Irvine discussed the challenges he has encountered in getting patients with epilepsy to undergo beneficial procedures, often due to misinformation.
The director of pediatric epilepsy and the Herscot Center for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex at Massachusetts General Hospital, and professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School discussed the findings of the GWPCARE6 trial of cannabidiol.
The professor and chief of pediatric neurology, and director of the comprehensive epilepsy program and neuroscience institute at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital offered insight into his experience with midazolam and its potential to play a vital role in treating seizure clusters.