International Epilepsy Congress 2019

The 33rd International Epilepsy Congress, taking place June 22-26, 2019 in Bangkok, Thailand, is a joint congress of the International League Against Epilepsy and the International Bureau for Epilepsy. The congress provides a forum for epilepsy specialists from around the world to come together, discuss the latest developments in basic and clinical epileptology, and network with fellow researchers, clinicians and other health care providers. The scientific program includes a wide range of main and parallel sessions, as well as teaching and video sessions.
The professor of medicine, neurology, at the University of Toronto discussed the need for physicians to work together while transitioning patients with epilepsy—who may have any number of comorbidities—from pediatric care to adult care.
The professor of medicine, neurology, at the University of Toronto spoke to the hurdles faced by both pediatric and adult neurologists when transitioning a patient with epilepsy from childhood care to adult care.
The clinical neuropsychologist and head of the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne discussed the results of a study she and colleagues conducted in which they mapped the long-term social outcomes of patient post-epilepsy surgery.
The clinical neuropsychologist and head of the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne detailed how the transition from states of illness to wellness after epilepsy surgery can result not just in brain changes, but psychosocial challenges for patients.
The clinical neuropsychologist and head of the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne spoke about what physicians need to provide to help patients through the adjustment period after epilepsy surgery.
The clinical neuropsychologist and head of the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne discussed the early-stage research into neurorehabilitation post-epilepsy surgery, and the promise it might hold to address surgery’s long-term risks.
The director of the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center discussed what’s currently being developed in the treatment of epilepsy, as well as the emergence of different methods of stimulation and neuromodulation.
The professor and chief of pediatric neurology at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center discussed the decision-making process for choosing interventions for patients with epilepsy, and how to keep patients adherent.
The professor and chief of pediatric neurology at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center spoke about the concerns of uncontrolled epilepsy and how to determine if a patient requires more than one treatment for their epilepsy.
The pediatric neurologist and epilepsy specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado discussed the popularity of cannabidiol from coverage in the media, and how she sees its use—and the understanding of it—evolving in the coming years.
The pediatric neurologist and epilepsy specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado spoke about the need to continue to research therapies once they’re approved to better understand their use, and how cannabidiol falls into this category.
The director of the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center spoke about the improvements that have come along with some of the surgical advancements in the treatment of epilepsy, specifically with laser interstitial thermal ablation.
The neurology resident at the University of California San Francisco discussed how new wearable technology and electronic diaries have helped improve the understanding of seizure rhythmicity, and ultimately, epilepsy care.
The neurology resident at the University of California San Francisco spoke about the role that seizure diaries can play in a patient’s peace of mind, as well as in the understanding of that patient’s response to a given treatment.
The professor of neurology at Cleveland Clinic’s epilepsy center discussed how algorithms can better influence the personalization of medicine, not just in the field of epilepsy, but in medicine as a whole.
The chief of neurology at Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology spoke about how to reassure patients with epilepsy who are planning for pregnancy and how to make treatment decisions with pregnant patients.
The professor of epilepsy and medical education at St. George’s University Hospital London spoke about the number of challenges plaguing epileptologists when treating patients who present with possible status epilepticus in the hospital.
The professor of neurology at Cleveland Clinic’s epilepsy center spoke about the limitations of individual physicians in making clinical decisions, and how utilizing algorithm data can help improve epilepsy interventions.